The Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2 lens has a unique signature and is quite beautiful. It’s of the MC era, so it is not capable of working in shutter priority mode. It will work in aperture priority mode though. This is what’s so great about the Minolta SLR system: until the Maxxum auto focus lenses, all lenses were compatible with all bodies, forward and backward. You might lose some features, but the worst that would happen is that you would shoot in manual mode, which is hopefully how you learned to take photos in the first place.

Minolta MC Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2

The beast

Anyway, just look at this beast. These MC lenses had beautiful knurled focus rings, all metal. No rubber grippy stuff here. A silver aperture ring with black engraved f-stops. The lens information engraved in white on the front of the focusing ring. A unique look for sure. And that glass, oooooh that lovely, fat, fast glass. This was an early type of coating for Minolta, and supposedly some of the coatings have not lasted as well as others. (Edit: This may not be true. See the comments below.)

I do keep a vintage Minolta 1B skylight filter on it when I’m shooting “bare,” and I often use colored filters on it for shooting black and white. I happened upon a nice collection of Minolta 55mm filters at some point, and they’re interesting to use. Nowadays, most people shoot digital, and they shoot color for black and white and do all their manipulations in Photoshop or Lightroom or whatever. Deliberately choosing a yellow, orange, or red filter as you’re shooting forces you to look at what you’re doing in a different way and creates more opportunities. I guarantee to you that having a red filter and black and white film loaded in your camera will have you looking at the sky a lot more often.

Brooklyn, 4th Avenue Marathon Route, taken with Minolta XD 11 and Minolta MC Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2 with red filter

Brooklyn, 4th Avenue Marathon Route, taken with Minolta XD 11 and Minolta MC Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2 with red filter, Tri-X (Arista Premium 400), Diafine.

The Empire State Building

Empire! Taken with Minolta XD 11 and MC Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2, Tri-X (Arista Premium 400), Diafine. This lens makes images like no other.

Shaun

Shaun, taken with Minolta XD 11, MC Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2, Tri-X (Arista Premium 400), Diafine. This lens helps create lovely portraits thanks to its thin depth-of-field wide open and short focusing distance.

Chinese take-out black and white photograph

Chinese take-out, 4th Avenue, Brooklyn, taken with Minolta XD 11, MC Rokkor-PG 58mm 1:1.2, Tri-X (Arista Premium 400), Diafine. Obviously with a lens this fast, night photography is a little easier.

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